Water-Related News

TECO’s new floating solar array will generate energy from Big Bend stormwater pond

Double-sided solar panels can produce as much as 30% more energy than traditional panels.

In November, Tampa Electric shared its vision for net-zero carbon emissions goal by 2050. This week, Tampa Electric offered a sneak peek at the new Big Bend Floating Solar Array under construction, expected to come online by the end of March.

The array comprises double-sided solar panels, which enables Tampa Electric to generate even more renewable energy using less space. Studies show double-sided panels can produce as much as 30% more energy than traditional panels.

“We are proud to lead the way on this innovative renewable energy project, and our customers will benefit,” said Archie Collins, president and chief executive officer of Tampa Electric. “Exploring alternative solutions like this, to maximize space while producing as much solar energy as possible, will play a significant role in achieving our vision of net-zero carbon emissions.”

The project consists of 1 megawatt (MW) solar panels sitting atop an existing pond at the Big Bend Power Station. The panels stretch over 3 acres. The company has installed 3,200 double-sided solar panels to maximize energy production by capturing the sunlight’s reflection on the water.